Posts from the ‘Photography’ category

Girdle Stanes

The Girdle Stanes is a stone circle near Eskdalemuir, Dumfries and Galloway.

The western portion of the circle has been washed away by the White Esk, leaving 26 of an original 40 to 45 stones in a crescent. Unlike the majority of such sites in Dumfriesshire, the Girdle Stanes forms a true circle rather than an oval.
When complete, its diameter would have been 39m.

A line of stones leads north to the Loupin Stanes; it is possible that this is the remains of an avenue linking the two circles.

Blea Tarn

Little Langdale is a valley in the Lake District, England containing Little Langdale Tarn and a hamlet also called Little Langdale. A second tarn, Blea Tarn, is in a hanging valley between Little Langdale and the larger Great Langdale to the north. Little Langdale is flanked on the south and southwest by Wetherlam and Swirl How, and to the north and northwest by Lingmoor Fell and Pike of Blisco. The valley descends to join with Great Langdale above Elter Water.

The Monreith Wreck

The schooner, Monreith, was built in Port William in 1880. On 12th November 1900 she was on a voyage from Newcastle, County Down to Silloth carrying 110 tons of granite kerb stones, when a storm blew up. She attempted to take shelter in the mouth of Kirkcudbright Bay where she was driven onto the sand banks of Goat Well Bay. Her crew all got safely ashore in the ship’s boat. Today her ribs can still be seen when the tide is low.

Crummock Water

Crummock Water is a lake in the Lake District in Cumbria, North West England situated between Buttermere to the south and Loweswater to the north. Crummock Water is 2.5 miles long, 0.75 mile wide and 140 feet deep. The River Cocker is considered to start at the north of the lake, before then flowing into Lorton Vale. The hill of Mellbreak runs the full length of the lake on its western side; as Alfred Wainwright described it ‘no pairing of hill and lake in Lakeland have a closer partnership than these’.

“The meaning of ‘Crummock’ seems to be ‘Crooked one’, from British” (Brythonic Celtic) “‘crumbaco’-‘crooked'”.[1] This may refer to the winding course of the River Cocker, which flows out of the lake, or refer to the bending nature of the lake itself. The word “‘water’ is the main Lakeland term for ‘lake'” [1]

The lake is owned by the National Trust. Scale Force, the highest waterfall in the Lake District, feeds the lake and has a drop of 170 feet.[2]

Water from the lake is treated at Cornhow water treatment works, near Loweswater,[3] and is distributed to the towns of Silloth-on-Solway, Maryport, Workington, Whitehaven, and many smaller towns, villages, and hamlets in the surrounding area for drinking and all other uses.[4]

Crummock Water gained attention in 1988 when the body of Sheena Owlett was found in the lake. It later transpired she had been murdered in Wetherby, West Yorkshire.

Buttermere

Buttermere is a lake in the English Lake District in North West England. The adjacent village of Buttermere takes its name from the lake. Historically in Cumberland, the lake is now within the county of Cumbria. It is owned by the National Trust, forming part of its Buttermere and Ennerdale property. Wikipedia

Hodge Close Quarry